5 Things You Must Do With a Log Cabin In Winter

Log cabins are probably the most popular trend in real estate today. People are in love with these gorgeous dwellings, especially as the McMansions that are so common continue to spread across the country. Who wants to live in something so cheaply made, especially when it looks exactly the same as every other boring house on the block?

But one of the drawbacks about log cabins is that they do require more maintenance. It is worth it, especially when considering value and permanence. After all, a log cabin can last for generations, where a cheaply made house can fall apart before the mortgage is even paid.

Here are five things you must do with a log cabin in winter to keep it in tip top condition.

Inspect The Outside

The outside of your cabin is where problems are most likely to occur. Weather can seriously wear down the condition of the outside and in areas where the climate is more extreme it is worst. Damp is especially bad for wood, which can rot or warp, though sunshine can cause cracks and dryness in the logs.

Every new season it is important than you do an inspection to make sure there are no impending issues that could cause problems. For instance, you might notice a thumb sized area of one of your walls it soft and presses inward. This is a sign of rot and once it has started it can quickly grow out of control. Or maybe you see a plank that has bulged out. This is wood warping, usually caused by moisture behind the wood that has caused it to expand outward.

Catching these things before the snow falls makes it easier to replace or repair anything that needs to be, It also gives you a chance to restain, something you should do to the wood every three to five years.

Inspect The Inside

Once the outside is secure it is time to go inside to see what might be done there. A log cabin is pretty solid and cozy, so hopefully you won’t run into any issues. But there are some that are possible to come across so you should always be vigilant in your inspections.

The first problem to look out for is signs of pests. As the weather turns colder, different creatures are going to seek shelter from the chill. Mice, insects, spiders and even small mammals like raccoons could be trying to find a way into your home as you read this. Once they get in they can wreak havoc, especially those that have burrowed into the wood like termites. They can cause damage to your house, due to scratching, biting, burrowing and waste.

Look for any signs of these critters. Go to the smaller areas of the house, like dark corners, unused rooms, closets, basements, attics or crawlspaces. Put a couple of barrier methods around your house to prevent anything from crossing over.

If you do find signs of an infestation, either bug bomb/spray yourself, or contact an exterminator who can lay out traps or fumigate for you. The sooner in the season you get it done, the better.

Pre-Spring Clean

We have all heard of Spring Cleaning, but Pre-Spring Cleaning may be even more crucial. If your house isn’t ready for the winter it isn’t ready for you to settle in and be comfortable during the frigid months ahead.

This includes removing all dust, mold and dirt from inside your home, freshening rooms that aren’t as commonly used, cleaning carpets or polishing hardwood floors, storing items for warmer months and cleaning/preparing ones for the colder and opening the chute to your fireplace and making sure it is clean and ready to go.

This might seem like a lot of work, but it is going to ensure your winter is a wonderland and not a nightmare.

Clean and Cover Gutters

Your gutters are going to be a major source of problems if you don’t get them regularly cleaned. When they back up with debris it allows rain and snow to gather and overflow, or to stay stagnant and rot the wood of your log cabin until it is cleared out. You want to make sure that never happens and so clean them out every few months.

For winter you won’t want to go out on a ladder and risk falling in the ice. So you should clear them at the beginning of the season and making sure there are no leaves still on trees nearby where they could drop in.

To keep any further debris you can get gutter covers. These little marvels allow you to snap them over the top, some magnetically and some using little clasps. This keeps things out and protects them through the winter.

You can also add an extender to the drain pipe. It will send water further from your home and keep water from building as the base of your log cabin, where it can damage the wood and foundation.

Weather strip Your Log Cabin

Want to keep cozy as the weather gets colder and colder? Stopping leaks and drafts is a good way to do it. Weather stripping will trap hot air in your home and keep it from letting out through cracks under the doors, around windows and even through your chimney, attic or basement.

You can hire someone to do it for you and it can be worth the extra cost to really seal things in. But weather stripping is also a DIY project that is pretty basic for most homeowners. You can find materials and kits online or at your local hardware store. The average cost is around $200 – $300 for an entire house. This can be more or less expensive, depending on if you do it yourself or hire someone to weatherize your log cabin for you.

Will the Raiders Domed Stadium Increase My Market Value?

The development of a $1.9 Billion dollar professional football stadium down the street from your current business location is usually a good thing. There are always those who may garner a real property value increase due to the stadiums location but then realize that the traffic from the new venue may destroy their ability to do business or it may make renting their building to a tenant or tenants more difficult. You can have a huge real property market value uptick and still lose your tenants or lose the utility of your building for its current use at the same time.

Appraisers are always asked “how much of a property value Increase can I expect?” It’s not something that can easily be answered because, as you know, each property is different and each will benefit more or less from the stadium development.

If you own a single-family residential home located 5 miles away from the planned stadium I wouldn’t hold my breath regarding appreciation, the stadium may provide some great entertainment to you if you can afford to pay for it but you will likely pay more in taxes for its construction than you will ever gain from your homes appreciation.

The domed stadium planned for Las Vegas is going to be developed west of Interstate 15 and thus west of the Las Vegas Strip in an area dominated by smaller existing industrial building development.

Thus, it is likely that many industrial properties located near the planned domed stadium site will likely increase in value over the next few years. If you look at other professional stadiuhe dome, but they can’t offer you that many choices. ms, I have, you will find that there are (look at the AT&T stadium in Arlington, TX for example) 30 to 50 restaurants surrounding it. Las Vegas is full of Strip based restaurants but do fans traveling in and out of the dome want to deal with the Strip just to get some food? Yes, they will sell you food inside of t

Industrial land often sells in Las Vegas for a price near $10 per square foot but fast food restaurant ground sells closer to $25 per square foot. There appears to be some upside potential for those willing to transition their properties from industrial to commercial, and much of the area surrounding the proposed Las Vegas dome stadium has already been planned for a tourist commercial use.

Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, MO is isolated from most private development, and the Bank of America stadium in Charlotte is isolated by highways. The Los Angeles Chargers stadium (StubHub Center) adjoins Cal State University and still has nearly 15 fast food restaurants close by.

Properties have to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and owners have to follow how the areas near the planned stadium are transitioning. If the stadium had been planned for the Strip side of the freeway there would likely have been much less potential for stadium-related development given the relatively high prices from the influence of the Strip, but west of the I-15 there are more possibilities.

The transition of the area away from small industrial users to stadium related uses will offer an opportunity to current owners and to investors who can benefit from locating close to the stadium.

Dilapidation Building Surveys and Their Value

Construction activity can sometimes leave tell-tale effects on adjacent properties that are situated too close to the site. Many reasons contribute to the effects of construction, including poor structural strength and ageing of the existing building. However, contractors and owners of proposed new constructions need to guard themselves from frivolous, false claims of damage to buildings. Dilapidation building surveys help owners and contractors to be armed with evidence from independent agencies that will protect them from exaggerated claims. Here is what needs to be known about dilapidation building surveys and the benefits of opting for one.

Pre-construction inspections

A pre-construction inspection would entail an in-depth analysis of the existing properties, including pictorial proof and thermal imaging of structures. This helps in the preparation of a comprehensive report that documents the structure and the presence of cracks, the extent and intensity of structural weakness etc. This dilapidation survey records proof of existing weakness which can be compared with the post construction conditions. This way, you would be able to determine and assess any damage if occurred because of constructional activity.

Post construction inspections

Similar to the pre-construction inspection, the post construction inspections record the status of the buildings and help in drawing up an extensive comparison to help disprove claims of damage, if any. With the use of latest equipment, including thermal imaging, the exact status of a building and the condition of timber and structures are profiled. This helps in scientifically disproving the claims of damage. At times, damage may have occurred to a certain extent, but the claims may end up being exaggerated in an attempt to receive higher compensation.

Constructional activity and effects on structures in vicinity

Constructional activity includes a large amount of vibration, excavation, soil dewatering and demolition. Depending on the structural condition of buildings in the vicinity and the distance between buildings, it is possible that effects may be felt to a certain extent. Dilapidation surveys not only document and protect owners from unfair demands, it also helps engineers to plan construction better by taking suitable alternative measures to prevent damage to adjacent structures. Architecture and constructional concepts have advanced to levels where it is now possible to greatly mitigate the effects of construction activity on buildings in the vicinity by adopting alternative techniques.

Professional expertise and advanced equipment

Typically, the surveys are conducted by teams of experienced professionals who rely on advanced equipment for collection of data regarding the structural strength or weakness of buildings. Structures may be compromised by termite nests, and timber may actually look good on the outside, while remaining more or less hollow on the inside. The use of the latest equipment, combined with years of experience help inspectors to compile reports that help to document the actual condition of buildings.

It is important to choose teams that are covered by professional indemnity and public liability insurance so as to protect the interests of homeowners seeking such services. The choice of such service providers needs to ideally be influenced by factors such as integrity, professionalism and certification.